FROM THE EDITOR’S DESK: Forecast – we lack six inches getting half a foot

Weather forecasters sure do have a tough job don’t they? But sometimes I can’t help but wonder if they don’t get a kick out of whispering the word snow and watching everyone go crazy. It’s like saying boo and watching an uneasy kid pee his pants at the sight of a horror house ghost.

If there are two words that will make people go crazy here in Tennessee they are these two – guns and snow.

Mention guns and get verbally molested before you can even speak your point of view. Mention snow and watch the masses sprint out of the gun stores and empty the bread shelves and milk coolers from every major store and mom-and-pop grocery in the county.

I am no weatherman. But I do take a keen interest in the weather forecast and I do play an amateur meteorologist during major storm events. But when snow comes into the forecast the inaccuracies last week by the folks who are supposed to take well-calculated guesses sure were terribly wrong.

At one point, Manchester was going to get anywhere from one to four inches of snow. Then it was reduced to possibly an inch. Coffee County Schools battened down the hatches, cancelled athletic events and may as well have declared a state of emergency for the large snow event that was sure to come.

Then Thursday came. The snow did not. Despite some skin-cutting wind, nothing was threatening about the weather Thursday. I saw a few pellets of sleet bounce off the pavement around lunchtime. By about 4 p.m. the sun was shining.

Maybe some of the weather forecasters, or all of them as a group, have a solid stake in bread and milk companies? In fact, the way the forecasts went last week for all of the Midstate I think several of them own large dairy farms.

They may even have somewhat of a stake in sidewalk salt.

All jokes aside, I don’t think they do profit from sending us all to the stores. But if they don’t, maybe they should.

-Josh Peterson is the editor of the Manchester Times. He has won TPA awards for his writing and photography. He can be reached by email at mteditor@lcs.net or by telephone at 931-728-7577 ext. 105. Follow him on Twitter @joshpeterson29


Posted on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 at 8:51 am