Home & Hearth  

Join us for a tour of some of Manchester’s most interesting homes 

 

Local couple Dustin and Rebecca Welch’s gingerbread-trimmed yellow two-story Folk Victorian home stands flanked with crepe myrtles and a white picket fence at the end West High Street. It takes its place in the original city plat almost in the literal shadow of the old Dave King Estate. Or as Dustin jokes, a walnut pitch from city hall.

The Welch’s chapter to the history of the home started 2.5 years ago when the family moved from East Nashville.  

“We wanted to immediately jump in and be a part of Manchester. Being centrally located and close to the schools, so that whenever community event came into play we could jump in and be a part,” Rebecca said.

As for which house they would settle on, this one was love at first sight.

“We fell in love with it from the moment we walked in the door,” Rebecca said.

“We looked everywhere and could not find a home that suited our taste,” Dustin explained.

“As soon as we walked in that door, I knew we were buying this house,” he said.

It’s their dream home. 

The Welch family purchased the home from the Freddie and Brenda Fibelkorns, who purchased the residence, a bit worse for wear, and restored it over three years.  

“We liked the cottage charm and that it was lovingly restored. We’ve always had a heart for old homes and the restoration process. We just were not nearly as gifted at it as the Fibelkorns were,” Rebecca said.

“A home is meant to be used for entertaining,” she said. “Having people over; so many laughs and good times have been shared around that dining room table.” 

 

Living history

 

The saying goes “if these walls could talk,” but in a way, they can. Framed in the Welch’s dining room is a marriage certificate from an early owner of the house. Behind the mantle is written the name of the builder.

The slightly off balance boards at the top of the stairs have been worn smooth from the foot traffic of some of the most prominent names in the county.

According to what the Welch’s have collected on the house’s history, Joe Scott first sold the property at the turn of the century to J.L. and Annie Ewell, who later sold it to lumber man and Peoples Bank original investor A.M. May and his wife Annie on Jan. 20, 1909.

It is guessed that May built the house because W.L. Smith bought a house on the property on Sept. 1, 1915 and held on to it until selling it in October 1924 to A.A. Williams and wife Georgia. Their daughter Alline Williams inherited the home in the 1960s and willed it to be sold and the proceeds distributed upon her death. That’s when the Fibelkorns purchased it in 2003.

The Welch’s have lived there since 2016 with their two children.

John has been with the Manchester Times since May 2011. He covers Lifestyles in addition to handling education reporting and general news assignments.John has won Tennessee Press Association awards for Best News Photo and placed in numerous other categories. John is a 1994 graduate of Tullahoma High School, a graduate of Motlow State Community College and earned a Bachelor of Arts in English from Middle Tennessee State University. He lives in Tullahoma, and enjoys the outdoors with his wife, Mitsy, and his 17-month-old, Sean.

Staff Writer

John has won Tennessee Press Association awards for Best News Photo and placed in numerous other categories. He is a graduate of THS, Motlow and MTSU. He lives in Tullahoma, and enjoys the outdoors with his wife, Mitsy, and his 17-month-old, Sean.

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