brisket

The beef brisket, from the steer’s lower chest region, is tough, or so says popular opinion. Yet, done right, this economical cut of meat, jammed packed with connective tissue, is one of the more flavorful cuts and is plenty tender.

First off, look for quality meat, It’s fine to get the vacuum sealed pack of meat, just make sure you’re buying from a good grocery.

Brisket is inherently tough, so the idea is low and slow cooking to allow the muscle fibers to soften as much as possible. Then, we’ll finish with a reverse sear on the grill to add some smoky goodness and some bite to the meat.

Crock pots are the ideal slow cooker, but if you got on board with the Instant Pot craze, pressure cooking seems to work even better and saves about seven hours of cook time.

Whichever slow cooker, you use, season the brisket with a liberal coating of salt and pepper. There are plenty of marinades, but with the great base taste of a brisket, it’s best to accent the flavor not mask it.

After about 6-7 hours in the slow cooker, start firing up the grill. Since the meat is basically cooked already, this will be a direct heat fire. Arrange the coals evenly in the grill. Right before adding the brisket, sprinkle some hickory chips onto the hot coals for more smoke.

Carefully pull the brisket from the slow cooker. Ideally the meat will be soft but not quite falling apart. If it’s shredding too much for the grill, drain completely and pile the meat in an oven safe roasting pan or old cast iron skillet.

Place on a moderate heat grill with all the vents closed for 20-30 minutes. Cook longer or use a hotter fire to char the outside.

Turn the brisket every 10-15 minutes to insure an even sear. Pull the brisket when all sides are browned. Rest in tin foil for a few minutes and slice.

Enjoy with Texas style barbecue sauce.   Original Stubbs is ideal.

John has been with the Manchester Times since May 2011. He covers Lifestyles in addition to handling education reporting and general news assignments.John has won Tennessee Press Association awards for Best News Photo and placed in numerous other categories. John is a 1994 graduate of Tullahoma High School, a graduate of Motlow State Community College and earned a Bachelor of Arts in English from Middle Tennessee State University. He lives in Tullahoma, and enjoys the outdoors with his wife, Mitsy, and his 17-month-old, Sean.

Staff Writer

John has won Tennessee Press Association awards for Best News Photo and placed in numerous other categories. He is a graduate of THS, Motlow and MTSU. He lives in Tullahoma, and enjoys the outdoors with his wife, Mitsy, and his 17-month-old, Sean.

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