County schools to provide beds for students in need

A new grant aims to ensure comfortable sleeping environment for Coffee County students. Coffee County Schools received $2,000 grant from Walmart that will provide beds for students that lack beds at home.

A new grant aims to ensure comfortable sleeping environment for Coffee County students.

Coffee County Schools received $2,000 grant from Walmart that will provide beds for students that lack beds at home.

“Our social worker, Connie Sekulich, received a $2,000 grant for buying beds,” said Director of Finance for Coffee County Schools Lisa Myers during the Oct. 14 school board meeting.

“This program is very important,” Myers said. “Without a good rest, how can our children concentrate the next day? Without their basic needs being met, they can’t concentrate, they can’t learn. If they can’t learn, that affects their future. We want the best future for all of our children here in Coffee County.”

Coffee County Schools Student Support Services Department received the Walmart Foundation Grant in June.

The funds will be used to ensure the needs of the homeless population are met.

The money can be used to purchase a bed for about $200 for each student in need, according to Myers.

Family members of the students eligible for the funds would be made aware of the available resources through communication with school employees. 

Sources of information include teachers, social workers and nurses, according to Charles Lawson, director of Coffee County Schools

“Teachers that are talking to students…sometimes they will hear a comment that the student is sleeping on the floor,” Lawson said.

A nurse will sometimes hear things from children and recognize the need, as well, added Lawson.

“If we’re not sure of the situation, a nurse at one school will contact a nurse at another school and ask them to speak to a sibling, especially if it’s commented by a young child,” Lawson said.

At that point, the Coffee County Schools Family Resource Center will contact the family members directly to make them aware of the resources.

“Most of the time, most of our information comes from direct contact with the kids,” Lawson said.

Adam Clark, principal of North Coffee Elementary School echoed Lawson in saying teachers, counselors and nurses are usually the first to hear about the need.

“Occasionally, home visits will reveal things like that,” Clark said.

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