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Manchester Parks and Recreation Department Complex and Ada Wright Center are getting some needed attention during the closure.

“We wanted to keep some of our part-time employees able to earn some money, so we decided that while we were shut down, why don’t we do the things we usually do in September during shutdown,” said Parks and Recreation Director Bonnie Gamble.

Each September, the department closes the Rec. Complex around the time of the Coffee County Fair to do cleaning, maintenance and repairs that wouldn’t be possible during regular hours.

“The entire Wellness Room was sanitized. We moved the equipment out, mopped the entire floor. You just can’t do that when you’re open,” Gamble said.

This was also a time to brighten the indoor pool with a fresh coat of paint on the walls.

“We’ve painted the lower half of the pool (area) a pretty blue-aqua color,” Gamble said, adding that the Makos Swim Team and the Coffee County Central High School swim team donated money for new lane lines.

The new lane lines are black and red colors to match flags that are flying in the pool area and the starting blocks.

“That was a really good partnership that helped us out,” Gamble said.

Gamble added that throughout the complex, workers have intensely cleaned the building, with attention to the locker rooms.    

“Right now we’re painting the Ada Wright Building inside and will be painting the outside too,” she said.

 

Helping Manchester stay fit

Manchester citizens’ health and welfare is always on the forefront of the Rec. Department’s mission, so while all classes are canceled, the staff have made fitness videos for people to try at home.

“We have the link on Facebook. The city doesn’t have the capability to post a long video on Facebook. You’re going to need a public YouTube account,” Gamble noted.

“As employees, we didn’t necessarily want it on our personal YouTube accounts,” she said, noting that local radio is hosting the videos.

The parks and greenway are open and free for the public to use. Gamble said that the playgrounds are open, but restricted to 10 people playing at a time. Restrooms are open.

“It’s at your own risk. We ask that you do stay six feet apart and do that hand washing. Our restrooms are open, we have plenty of hand soap for people to wash their hands,” she said.

“Not every family has a backyard. Some live in apartments or are crowded together and they don’t have that capability. Kids need to expend energy. They need to get out. It’s good for their emotional and mental health as well as their family, so we provide that outlet,” Gamble said.   

John has been with the Manchester Times since May 2011. He covers Lifestyles in addition to handling education reporting and general news assignments.John has won Tennessee Press Association awards for Best News Photo and placed in numerous other categories. John is a 1994 graduate of Tullahoma High School, a graduate of Motlow State Community College and earned a Bachelor of Arts in English from Middle Tennessee State University. He lives in Tullahoma, and enjoys the outdoors with his wife, Mitsy, and his 17-month-old, Sean.

Staff Writer

John has won Tennessee Press Association awards for Best News Photo and placed in numerous other categories. He is a graduate of THS, Motlow and MTSU. He lives in Tullahoma, and enjoys the outdoors with his wife, Mitsy, and his 17-month-old, Sean.

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